Patagonia’s Approach to Production

Patagonia

 

Production (social)

Patagonia sells everything from wetsuits, to rock climbing gear, and everything in between. I used to work in a surf shop called Sun Deigo (unfortunately) and we carried an extensive line of Patagonia’s merchandise, including both men and women’s t-shirts, jackets, pants and accessories. For a company that sells so much different inventory, is is importanrt to ask where it all gets made, and how it affects the people who produce it.

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The company endorses on its website that it “promotes fair labor practices, and safe working conditions throughout the entire supply chain.”

 

This photo depicts factory workers in what appears to be the assembly stage of the supply chain. There is a great deal of information supplied about the factories that Patagonia chooses to work with on their website. Look here : http://www.patagonia.com/us/patagonia.go?assetid=67583

 

They also show various other parts of the supply chain that they work with to reduce emissions, eliminate child labor, and reduce other harmful costs of doing business as much as possible.

 

For example, Patagonia makes sure to force their suppliers to take a sourcing questionnaire, and map their own smaller supply chains. “For every one of our fabrics or trims, we require a profile sheet, a supply chain tracking sheet and all relevant third-party certificates.”

 

Following is a copy of the certification requirements for organic cotton products.

 

Certification requirements for organic Cotton Products

Since 1996, all of the cotton fabrics used in our products have been made from 100% organic cotton fiber. We request the following verifying certificates to support our claims.

For sourcing and pre-production:

Obtain a scope certificate stating that the spinning facility can process organic cotton (required)

Obtain a scope certificate stating that the knitting or weaving facility can process organic cotton (optional)

Communicate that the cotton must be certified organic to the National Organic Program (NOP) standard by a USDA- accredited third party

For production:

Obtain farm certificates stating that the farms that supplied the cotton are certified to the NOP standard (required)

Obtain transaction certificates for the fiber used in each product shipment, stating that the fiber meets the NOP standard, and issued by a USDA-accredited certifying body (required)

Notes:

NOP = National Organic Program of the USDA

USDA = United States Department of Agriculture

Farm certificate = a certificate issued for an agricultural farm

Scope certificate = a certificate issued for a processing facility

Transaction certificate = a certificate issued for a purchasing Transaction

All certificates should be issued from accredited certification Bodies

All certificates should be valid at the time of submission

Keep an updated scope certificate stating that the spinning facility can process organic cotton (required)

Keep an updated scope certificate stating that the knitting or weaving facility can process organic cotton (optional)

Obtain yarn certificates stating that the yarns meet organic standards or contain organic cotton (optional)

Obtain fabric certificates stating that the finished fabrics meet organic standards or contain organic cotton (optional)

Obtain product certificates stating that the finished products meet organic standards or contain organic cotton (optional)

page 1 ©2012 Patagonia, Inc

 

-Dave

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Patagonia’s Approach to Production

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